We will reopen as soon as government guidance allows. See why it was listed, view it on a map, see visitor comments and photos and … Hut 8 was a section in the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park (the British World War II codebreaking station, located in Buckinghamshire) tasked with solving German naval (Kriegsmarine) Enigma messages. [2], After 2005, the first Hut 8 was restored to its wartime condition, and it now houses the "HMS Petard Exhibition".[3]. This is Hut 8 at Bletchley Park. SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE: Hut 8's significance is primarily historic. From the start of 1940, soon after GCCS was set up at Bletchley Park, the hut was an important component of the operation, which is renowned for its part in this breaking of the German Enigma code, and in contributing to the Allied victory (especially in the Battle of the Atlantic). Hut 8 is where they broke the enigma code. It was the hut where the unit broke the German Enigma Naval messages, and where important figures such as Alan Turing and Hugh Alexander worked. Bletchley Park is now open. In addition to the cryptanalysts, around 130 women worked in Hut 8 and provided essential clerical support including punching holes into the Banbury sheets. In February 1942, the German navy introduced "Triton", a version of Enigma with a fourth rotor for messages to and from Atlantic U-boats; these became unreadable for a period of ten months during a crucial period (see Enigma in 1942). Formerly the Codebreaking Hut leading the breaking of German Naval Enigma messages, today Hut 8 houses exciting interactive exhibitions helping you understand the different methods the Codebreakers used to help them with their work. © 2005 - 2020 LESLIE HOSSACK. Summer opening hours From 09.30 to 17.00 (last admission 15.00) Winter opening hours (1 Nov 2020 – 29 Feb 2021) From 09.30 to 16.00 [1], Coordinates: 51°59′50″N 0°44′31″W / 51.99717°N 0.74193°W / 51.99717; -0.74193, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hut_8&oldid=986573712, Articles with unsourced statements from September 2013, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 1 November 2020, at 18:17. If you have any ticket enquiries, please, Closure due to national lockdown in England. Hut 8 at Bletchley Park is a Grade II listed building in Milton Keynes, Milton Keynes, England. Bletchley Park now open. It was the hut where the unit broke the German Enigma Naval messages, and where important figures such as Alan Turing and Hugh Alexander worked. Formerly the Codebreaking Hut leading the breaking of German Naval Enigma messages, today Hut 8 houses exciting interactive exhibitions helping you understand the different methods the Codebreakers used to … Patrick Mahon succeeded Alexander in September 1944.[1]. Hut 8 was a section in the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park (the British World War II codebreaking station, located in Buckinghamshire) tasked with solving German naval (Kriegsmarine) Enigma messages. This eventually led to the creation of the first computers. [citation needed] Messages were sent to and from across the Atlantic by enciphered teleprinter links. Due to a second national lockdown in England, Bletchley Park is temporarily closed until early December. Royal Pigeon Racing Association exhibition, explaining the use of pigeons in WW2. Hut 8, Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire 2014. Hut 8 was partnered with Hut 4, which handled the translation and intelligence analysis of the raw decrypts provided by Hut 8. Located initially in one of the original single-story wooden huts, the name "Hut 8" was retained when Huts 3, 6 & 8 moved to a new brick building, Block D, in February 1943. The Government Code & Cypher School at Bletchley Park, once the top-secret home of the WW2 Code breakers. Hut 8 is Grade II listed. The Office of Alan Turing, Head of Hut 8, recreated to how it would have looked in World War Two complete with a mug chained to the radiator. The exteriors. We use cookies to enhance your experience of our website. The Office of Alan Turing, Head of Hut 8, recreated to how it would have looked in World War Two complete with a mug chained to the radiator. This is Hut 8 at Bletchley Park. Britain produced modified bombes, but it was the success of the US Navy bombe that was the main source of reading messages from this version of Enigma for the rest of the war.